Tag Archives: Trends

No News is Good News


Screen Shot 2017-10-28 at 11.40.03 AMSo, you wake up every morning with a sort of looming dread. It’s been a year or more of this. The newspaper is sitting by the front door or you grab your phone to read it online. You go from a state of relatively refreshed well-being (because unconscious), and then you basically screw yourself. Bam. The reality of what’s happening in our country and our planet comes crashing back down. Great way to start your day. You’re a genius. Fun times.

So how do we protect ourselves and still remain decent citizens who give a crap about making the world a better place? If we don’t pay attention, we feel guilty or we feel out of it. And then guilty. I have met several people who say they are empaths and this time is just too difficult for them. Dude. You don’t have to be an empath. It sucks for everyone. So what to do?

Here are some strategies both emotional and practical that I have been working with this year that can maybe help.

1. Drink heavily.

2. Okay kidding. Let’s start over.

1. This one is stupidly obvious: don’t start your day with the news. Seriously though, give yourself at least one hour of carefree ignorant bliss. Make pancakes for your family. Brush your teeth. I mean how do you expect to save us all from North Korea when you haven’t brushed your teeth. First things first. And then experiment with that. Can you possibly go until lunchtime? Unless you work in news or education or perhaps political satire (gaaahhhh, I know, I screwed the pooch), the only real repercussion that will probably happen is that you’ll not know what people are talking about and have to hear about the news at the water cooler. I’m going to shock you: I’ve decided not to read the news until lunchtime. Your coworkers will look at you, horrified, but give it one month. You’ll be changed. And they will either sneer at you with jealousy, or follow your lead. Either way you win.

2. Change the way you read your news. One thing I did for a little while was save to it up. Read the papers all at once but only every 3 or 4 days. My husband was concerned that I was becoming a hoarder, because of my stack of 4 newspapers, which were eventually relegated to the closet until I was ready to read them so friends didn’t do a hoarder intervention… Cuz, I’ve already been on one reality TV show… It was a great way to skim what I needed to know without having to do it every day. And in fact – – bonus! – – by the time you get to it, three out of four stories are moot anyway! Or at least all you really need to know is what’s in that fourth installment of that news item and you didn’t need to know all the steps along the way. Start on the 4th paper and work your way backward in time.

3. Weekly magazines or weekly online wrap-ups! I love the week in reviews. I also like weekly magazines because you get more in-depth conversation and complexity rather than just up-to-the-minute hyperbole and clickbait.

4. Talk to humans. This one feels important. But it’s certainly more interesting than reading headlines or catching CNN’s Breaking news. This probably doesn’t hold for you if you’re doing weekly visits to your Breitbart-obsessed uncle. In that case try a quick conversation changing distractor like: “Hey! Did you know The Jews invented football?” Then watch him try to work out what to do about that.

5. The history channel: when all else fails, watch something about The American Revolution, The Civil War, The Holocaust. And while you might think this is a horrible idea, because your brain starts making connections to the dystopian future that seems to be looming, it does help to remember that everything is cyclical. Most of all, politics. There will be a moment again in our future where we can look forward to more of that hopey-changey stuff. I promise.

6. Watch the show “Bob’s Burgers.” I don’t know. It might help.

That’s all I got.

Whatchew got? Tell us here:

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Another Anti-dote to Complaining: Humor


After spending a week engaged in creative play, check back and see how this worked for you after your mindfulness training from the previous weeks. I found a great question this week: Which choice will bring more love into the world?

I changed it to ask which choice will bring more creativity into the world because I see them as intrinsically linked. More joy almost always follows from creativity as well. You probably have seen the potholder quote you see in stores like at Cracker Barrel: “If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” Well, there’s something to that (more for some of us than others…) and I know when I’m being creative, then this mama’s happy. And those around me are too.

Having a sense of humor about what’s hard in your life or what’s wrong in the world, and expressing it creatively (and by that I mean even just joking about it with friends and family) is a deeply important practice. When you are laughing about something, you are by the very nature of it stepping back from it. Humor requires perspective and un-attachment, in the Buddhist sense. If it’s not already, humor needs to become an important part of your spiritual daily practice. And I don’t mean you gotta tell knock knock jokes at the office (although my 8-year-old has some killer original ones…I’m so proud). What I mean is you need to cultivate the ability to see what’s funny.

Okay, quick comedy lesson. There are only 3 things that are funny: the familiar (like celebrity impressions or when a friend tells you about her 4-year-old putting underwear on over his pants – cuz we’ve all been there…),  irony – which is also called incongruity or the unexpected (like if Sarah Palin showed up at a peace rally), and finally, misfortune (Dick Cheney shooting his pal in the face). Or some combination of these, like Dick Cheney showing up at a peace rally with his underwear on over his pants. Okay, got it? So, no need to be mystified or intimidated by comedy. It’s pretty simple.